Wall Street Journal Quote about OIS Stats

From The Wall Street Journal, by columnist Jason L. Riley:

“An increase in press coverage of police shootings isn’t the same thing as an increase in police shootings.” 
 


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Mandatory Drug Testing for Officer Involved Shootings

Attention Administrators!

Did you know the Police Community Relations Improvement Act was amended effective August 25, 2017

 Each law enforcement agency shall adopt a written policy regarding an officer-involved shooting

and it must now include drug testing.


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High Court Denies Police Liability in Use-of-Force Case

High Court Denies Police Liability in Use-of-Force Case

The U.S. Supreme Court today unanimously struck down a “provocation rule” of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, which said that police officers may be held liable when they seize someone using reasonable force after committing a separate Fourth Amendment violation that contributed to the need to use force.


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Cops involved in Tamir Rice shooting tell their stories

Cops involved in Tamir Rice shooting tell their stories in newly-released videos

Until now, Timothy Loehmann and Frank Garmback's statement offered the only public accounting from the officers' perspectives

CLEVELAND — Two and a half years after 12-year-old Tamir Rice was shot and killed by a Cleveland police officer, cleveland.com has obtained the videos - never before seen publicly -- of investigative interviews with the officers involved, Timothy Loehmann and Frank Garmback.


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Registration Deadline for Deadly Force Investigations: Is your Department Ready for an Officer Involved Shooting?

The April 13th Deadline is fast approaching!

Deadly Force Investigations:

 Is your Department Ready for an Officer Involved Shooting?

4 Hours

Any officer who may find themselves involved in the use of deadly force should know what will happen during the investigation. All Investigators, on-scene supervisors, officers in-charge, police administrators & state attorneys should know the best practices identified by experienced investigators.


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FallenProject.com

FallenProject.com


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Pew Research Center- Ferguson Effect Real, Survey Finds
Behind the BadgeAmid protests and calls for reform, how police view their jobs, key issues and recent fatal encounters between blacks and policeBy Rich Morin, Kim Parker, Renee Stepler and Andrew Mercer

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White Police Officers Don't Unfairly Target Black Suspects, study says
By Cody DerespinaPublished November 16, 2016FoxNews.comThe day after a Minnesota cop was charged in the July shooting death of a black man, an in-depth study purported to show race generally does not play a role in police shootings.Among the findings of the investigation released Thursday by the Crime Prevention Research Center: White police officers are not significantly more likely to shoot black suspects; body cameras have had little effect on decreasing police killings; the more cops at the scene, the less likely it is a suspect will be shot.POLICE SEE HIGHER THREAT OF AMBUSH AFTER YEAR OF UNRESTThe study examined data from 2013 to 2015, a time period which almost perfectly bookends the police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., in August 2014, an episode that helped lead to the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement and placed increased scrutiny on police shootings. Yet, the research team of John Lott and Carlisle Moody found the percentage of black suspects killed in the 19 months before Brown's death (24.8 percent) was almost exactly the same as the percentage killed in the 16 months after Brown's death (25 percent)."You might have imagined that if people were shooting black suspects for some type of racial animus, you might imagine there would be a change before and after Ferguson," Lott told FoxNews.com. "And yet [cops] seem to shoot, for black suspects, it's perfectly flat between the two periods of time."Lott and Moody examined 2,699 police killings from m

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Video- Why Do Cops Shoot Unarmed People?
A good video explaining the realities involved. by Bob Owens and posted on BearingArms.comhttps://youtu.be/FYSsCaUFexw YouTuber "possumpopper89" has crafted a 6-minute video that does a fairly good job of explaining why law enforcement officers (and some "regular Joe" citizens with defensive firearms training) sometimes shoot unarmed people.People who lack this kind of training (which is probably close to 95% of the general population) hold the mistaken belief that officers wait until they see and identify a weapon in a suspect's hand before deciding to open fire.That is simply not the case much of the time. In many instances, it isn't possible to visually identify a weapon due to lighting conditions or attempts by dangerous criminals to conceal a weapon even as they bring them into play.The simply fact of the matter is that you can never react as fast as the other person acts. It requires you to observe the other person's actions, orient (analyze and synthesize the incoming data through the lens past experiences, training, culture, and genetic filters), decide on a response, and then act to carry out that decision.This observe-orient-decide-act process then feeds into the next, as you re-observe, re-orient, make a new decision, and the proceed to your next action. It's a constant series of actions that occurs during your waking hours, first described by U.S. Air Force Col. John Boyd, and it's universally known as the OODA loop.It's that second O, "orient" that explains

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Famous police-shooting database has infamous shortcomings
A national online database compiled by the Washington Post is widely considered to be the go-to place for statistics on fatal shootings by police. But how reliable is it? Kevin Davis, a prominent use-of-force trainer from Ohio, recently took a probing look at one frequently cited category in the Post s aggregation: officers deadly shootings of unarmed individuals. The Post claims that 93 unarmed subjects were killed by police in the US in 2015. Davis examined each one, using the same public information available to the Post. His findings, published by our strategic partner PoliceOne.com, are illuminating. Four individuals the Post lists as having been unarmed were, in fact, armed in the traditional sense. Most often these were reaching for or drawing a weapon when shot and killed, Davis confirmed. Several others were shot accidentally while in close proximity to an armed associate who was actively firing at officers. One woman, for example, was shot when her boyfriend started shooting at officers from their car and the cops returned fire. By Davis count, 10 subjects had some type of contact weapon other than a firearm. These included a hatchet that was thrown at officers, a large metal spoon used against an officer after a mentally ill subject tried to heave him over an apartment balcony, a tree branch, and a police radio with which two officers were savagely beaten. The Post describes 34 shootings as occurring during attacks in progress. Davis found 50, nearly 50% more t

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Research Brief: Dispelling the Myths Surrounding Police Use of Lethal Force
Page four of this brief states thefact critics are ignoring: Regardless of how many deaths occur annually from police use of force, the true measure of concern should be how often the police are unjustified in their use of deadly force. If the police are properly using their legal authority to use lethal force, then they cannot control how many deaths occur as that is dependent on the number of people causing or threatening imminent serious bodily injury (i.e., broken bone, punctured flesh, etc.) to an officer or third party. In order to determine if the police are killing "too many" people each year, we need to take into consideration the number of people who are violently assaulting police officers. Over the last three years there has been growing concern in the public discourse about the use of force, especially lethal force, by the police in the United States. This concern spawned the creation of the Black Lives Matter organization and motivated President Obama to organize a commission on policing in the 21st century. Concerns over several highly publicized and politicized deaths of African-American men by police use of force have produced numerous public protests in almost every city, town, and university in the nation. Most of these protests have been peaceful, but many have not, especially the protest in Dallas on July 7 that resulted in eleven officers being shot, five of them fatally.In the public discussion around the topic of police use of force, many disturbing cl

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Outside Training Opportunity- Concerns of Police Survivors (C.O.P.S.) Traumas of Law Enforcement
ThistrainingisNOTbeingpresented orendorsedbyMTU#1. Rather, is being published to advise you of its availability.Please register according to the instructions provided below,asMTU#1 is unable to assist you with registrations orprovide any additional information on thistraining.Traumas of Law Enforcement April 11-13, 2016 Bettendorf, Iowa (Quad Cities Area)Training Location: Bettendorf Public Library,2950 Learning Campus Drive - Bettendorf, Iowa 52722Hotel: Hilton Garden Inn Bettendorf/Quad Cities,959 Middle Road - Bettendorf, Iowa 52722Hotel Phone: (563) 265-2121 / Hotel Room Rate: $99/night plus 12% tax- Airport shuttle service is available from 8:00 am - 10:00 pm- Complimentary parkingRegistration Deadline: March 18, 2016 2016 Traumas of Law Enforcement brochure.2016 Traumas of Law Enforcement on-line registration.OverviewEach year, Concerns of Police Survivors (C.O.P.S.) provides training to America's law enforcement agencies on how to appropriately respond to officers and their families affected by line-of-duty traumas through the "Traumas of Law Enforcement" trainings. At these trainings, instructors will present information that is important to America's law enforcement agencies regarding appropriate response to line-of-duty death, disability, critical incidents, and police suicide.The training is presented over three days and includes 21-hours of class time. The "Traumas of Law Enforcement" has been said to be "the best training I have taken in my entire law

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PoliceOne Reality Training Videos added to website
Three links to some excellent "PoliceOne" Roll Call -Reality Training videos have been added to the MTU1 website's video page-Responding to an Incident in Plainclothes-How to Survive an Off-Duty Encounter-Vital Principles of Foot Pursuits 

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Dealing with Downed Suspects: Some Lessons from the VALOR Project about How to Properly Manage the Immediate Aftermath of Officer-Involved Shootings
Dealing with Downed Suspects: Some Lessons from the VALOR Project about How to Properly Manage the Immediate Aftermath of Officer-Involved ShootingsBy David Klinger, Associate Professor, University of MissouriSt. Louis; and Senior Fellow, the Police Foundationhe U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance recently launched the Preventing Violence against Law Enforcement and Ensuring Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR) program, an initiative designed to enhance the safety of police officers around the United States. The VALOR program has many moving parts, including a research endeavor in which the author of this article conducts interviews of police officers who have been involved in incidents in which they or other officers discharged their firearms against suspects. As of February 2012, 198 officers in 11 states had been interviewed; data collection is scheduled to stop after 20 or so additional interviews have been completed. read article

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