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LEXIPOL- Imperfect Recall: How Memory Impacts Police Use of Force Investigations

 

From LEXIPOL website

By Jason Helfer

Human beings, regardless of training and experience, are not robots. They have unique physical attributes, states of health and life experiences that shape the context in which they perceive their world.

And police officers are human beings. A job title, training or experience does not mean an officer’s brain will process information any different than that of a civilian. And yet, too often the expectations the public—and even law enforcement agencies—places on police officers fail to account for the limitations of sensory input and processing.

 


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Wall Street Journal Quote about OIS Stats

From The Wall Street Journal, by columnist Jason L. Riley:

“An increase in press coverage of police shootings isn’t the same thing as an increase in police shootings.” 
 


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Fighting the Opioid Crisis through Substance Use Disorder Treatment by ICJIA

Fighting the Opioid Crisis through Substance Use Disorder Treatment: A Study of a Police Program Model in Illinois

Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority

Seeking to more effectively help individuals suffering from opioid use disorder, police departments across the country are embracing a deflection model that offers treatment access to those in need. Researchers interviewed representatives of seven law enforcement agencies employing treatment program models in Illinois to better understand operations, leverage lessons learned, measure sustainability, and inform other agencies as they implement their own programs.

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Helping Domestic Violence Victims
Helping Domestic Violence Victims 
Richard R. Johnson, Ph.D.
Dolan Consulting Group 
September, 2017
Domestic violence (DV) calls pose a number of physical safety and legal liability risks for law enforcement officers. These calls involve crimes between people with complex relationship issues that can make investigating these crimes very difficult for officers. In fact, one study that surveyed patrol officers from 13 different municipal police departments in the Chicago metro area revealed that, despite the physical dangers associated with DV calls, officers’ greatest frustrations with handling these calls were associated with DV victims. Approximately 38% of surveyed officers indicated that dealing with victim behaviors was their greatest frustration about handling DV calls. Specifically, officers expressed frustration over victim behaviors such as refusing to cooperate with their investigation, recanting statements, refusing to testify, or refusing to end the relationship with the batterer....

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Can Mental Health Courts Stop the Revolving Door of Justice?

Can Mental Health Courts Stop the ‘Revolving Door’ of Justice?


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Addressing the Elephant in the Room

From Bruce Talbot

Addressing the Elephant in the Room

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration announced on August 30, 2017 a major initiative to address Carfentenil abuse. Carfentenil, widely called "elephant tranquilizer" in media reports is an incredibly potent synthetic narcotic used on zoo animals. 


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Do Criminal Defendants Have Web Rights?

By |

Court-imposed web restrictions applied to criminal defendants may be going the way of dial-up internet service.

In June, the Supreme Court issued a unanimous ruling in Packingham v. North Carolina that invalidated a state law banning registered sex offenders from accessing websites that could facilitate direct communications with minors.


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Community Policing is Not Soft on Crime: The Evidence

Community Policing is Not Soft on Crime: The Evidence 
  Research Brief - Dolan Consulting

Richard R. Johnson, Ph.D.
  
August, 2017

Dolan Consulting Group is committed to the principles of community-oriented policing. Unfortunately, we sometimes encounter push back from attendees in our courses that suggest community-oriented policing strategies are some form of a “hug-a-thug” philosophy that is soft on crime and criminals. We are often baffled when we encounter such views as we struggle to understand how community-oriented policing strategies, designed to include law abiding citizen input to determine crime priorities and responses, could be considered soft on crime.


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When is a CDL Required?

from the Illinois Truck Enforcement Association

The world of truck enforcement is a world of never ending questions. Most people will agree the second heaviest regulated industry in the United States needs rules and regulations. Most people will also agree there is a great deal of discontinuity in the dissemination of these laws, how they are to be interpreted and how they are to be enforced. This level of discontinuity gives birth to such organizations as the Illinois Truck Enforcement Association. The article this week will cover one of these laws – the Uniform Commercial Driver’s License Act.


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10 Ways Police Can Identify Radical Extremism

10 Ways Police Can Identify Radical Extremism

By Leischen Stelter, editor of In Public Safety

Police officers around the country understand they are an important element in the fight against terrorism. But what does that entail? How can an officer identify potential terrorist activity? What should officers look for as signs a person may have been radicalized?


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Examining the Facts on Implicit Bias

Examining the Facts on Implicit Bias

Richard R. Johnson, Ph.D.  May, 2017 from the Dolan Consulting Group - Research Brief
 
A number of sources have claimed that public employees are influenced by implicit biases. The U.S. Department of Justice, the Police Executive Research Forum, and the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, for example, have suggested that law enforcement officers hold unconscious, implicit biases against people of color.1 It has been argued that these implicit biases cause police officers to enforce the law in ways that discriminate against members of racial minority groups. Similar claims have been made against prosecutors, judges, and probation officers as an explanation for the disproportionate representation of racial minorities in our prisons and jails. Allegations have also been levelled against teachers and school administrators, suggesting that they treat white students preferentially over minority students, and that they do so as a result of these same unconscious, implicit biases.


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FBI investigation into spike of law enforcement Attacks

Report: Cops feel betrayed by politicians, say they encourage attacks

by |  in the Washington Examiner

An internal FBI investigation into the spike of attacks on law enforcement has determined that revenge, inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, the media's assault on police shootings, and criticism from politicians, is the what motivates a "majority" of those targeting cops.

"Law enforcement officials believe that defiance and hostility displayed by assailants toward law enforcement appears to be the new norm," said the internal report stamped "For Official Use Only."

 


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Murders in US very concentrated: 54% of US counties in 2014 had zero murders, 2% of counties have 51% of the murders

This article is for your information and is NOT being presented or endorsed by the NICJC. While not necessarily related to the MTU or ILETSB, it is information we thought would be helpful, beneficial, or of interest to you in some way.

From the Crime Prevention Research Center

Murders in US very concentrated: 54% of US counties in 2014 had zero murders, 2% of counties have 51% of the murders

25 Apr , 2017  

The Distribution of murders

The United States can really be divided up into three types of places. Places where there are no murders, places where there are a few murders, and places where murders are very common.


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How Trump Can Help the Cops

from the magazine - City Journal

How Trump Can Help the Cops

The administration must change the Obama narrative that policing is the problem.

Heather Mac Donald  Spring 2017

Donald Trump vigorously defended law enforcement during his presidential campaign. He pledged to restore order to the nation’s cities—where violent crime is surging—and to reinvigorate the rule of law. His appointment of conservative Republican senator Jeff Sessions as attorney general was a strong signal that Trump’s words were more than campaign rhetoric. Now that the Trump administration and the Sessions-led Justice Department are up and running, where should they focus their efforts?


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Verbal Contact and Cover Protecting Your Colleagues and Your Profession

Verbal Contact and Cover Protecting Your Colleagues and Your Profession
 
Chief Harry P. Dolan (Ret.)
 
March, 2017

  
Far too often today, I believe, police officers are being ‘rope-a-doped’ by manipulative people out on the street. Taken from the tactic famously employed by boxing legend Muhammad Ali, the ‘rope-a-dope’ is when a challenging or manipulative person says things that are intentionally crafted to get under your skin, make you angry, and get you to act unprofessionally. YouTube© is filled with videos of officers who have fallen prey to the rope-a-dope by a citizen who has taunted the officer into acting like a “dope”. Individuals and organized groups with anti-police agendas are actively trying to entice officers to act inappropriately so that they can catch the officer’s reaction on video and become the next viral video sensation.


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Why Priority Management Trumps Time Management
“Time management is an oxymoron. Time is beyond our control, and the clock keeps ticking regardless of
how we lead our lives. Priority management is the answer to maximizing the time we have.”
John C Maxwell, best-selling author, speaker, & consultant on Leadership.
 
If you’re a knowledge worker, you’re probably undervaluing your time. If you waste a lot of time doing administrative things, creating your own systems and hacking excel, Google docs, and the like, you’re probably not making the most of your time. There’s also likely rudimentary tasks that you should be outsourcing to save you time, whether it be asking someone else to help you, hiring a Task Rabbit, or using a 3rd party tool or service.

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Do You Have Someone Else's Monkey on Your Back?

Management Time: Who’s Got the Monkey?

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published in the November–December 1974 issue of HBR and has been one of the publication’s two best-selling reprints ever.

For its reissue as a Classic, the Harvard Business Review asked Stephen R. Covey to provide a commentary.

Why is it that managers are typically running out of time while their subordinates are typically running out of work? Here we shall explore the meaning of management time as it relates to the interaction between managers and their bosses, their peers, and their subordinates.

Specifically, we shall deal with three kinds of management time:


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Law Officer Article- Supreme Court to Consider Liability For "Provoking" Use of Force
The outcome of Supreme Court Case 16-369 (Los Angeles County, Ca v. Mendez) could pose significant challenges for law enforcement-and police training.Provoking Use of ForceBasically, the main issue involves whether law enforcement officers are entitled to qualified immunity or liable for "provoking" the need for use of force-according to the "provocation rule" created within the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.Here's the background of the caseSynopsis: Los Angeles County, Ca v. Angel Mendez, et al.In October 2010, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department deputies conducted a warrantless search of a house looking for a wanted parolee. The deputies knocked and announced at the door of residence-and did not violate Fourth Amendment rights.Deputies were told that the man they were looking for was in a shack in the backyard.Two deputies of the team of 12 involved approached the shack and opened the door. Inside, they encountered Angel and Jennifer Mendez.Court documents state that at the precise moment the deputies entered the shack, Angel Mendez was "holding only a BB gun that he kept by his bed to shoot rats" in the shed, and that he "was in the process of moving the BB gun so he could sit up in bed."READ ARTICLE

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City Journal Article-Violence in the Halls, Disorder in the Malls
The holiday hooliganism traces back to the Obama administration's destructive efforts to undermine school discipline.Heather Mac DonaldDecember 29, 2016Public safety Judging by video evidence, the participants in the violent mall brawls over the Christmas weekend were overwhelmingly black teens, though white teens were also involved. The media have assiduously ignored this fact, of course, as they have for previous violent flash mob episodes. That disproportion has significance for the next administration's school-discipline policies, however. If Donald Trump wants to make schools safe again, he must rescind the Obama administration's diktats regarding classroom discipline, which are based on a fantasy version of reality that is having serious real-world consequences.The Obama Justice and Education Departments have strong-armed schools across the country to all but eliminate the suspension and expulsion of insubordinate students. The reason? Because black students are disciplined at higher rates than whites. According to Washington bureaucrats, such disproportionate suspensions can mean only one thing: teachers and administrators are racist. The Obama administration rejects the proposition that black students are more likely to assault teachers or fight with other students in class. The so-called "school to prison" pipeline is a function of bias, not of behavior, they say.READ ARTICLEHeather Mac Donaldis the Thomas W. Smith Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a contributing e

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Article- Millennial Thoughts on Peelian Principles
In 2017, let's live up to the ideals at the heart of modern policingBy Elijah Woodward| Jan 4, 2017

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